Posts Tagged ‘candy.com’

The Jelly Belly Candy Company‘s Chairman of the Board Herman Goelitz Rowland, Sr., and his daughter/Executive Vice Chairman Lisa Rowland Brasher open up to Candy.com about working in a multigeneration family business that goes back to 1869, their business challenges, and favorite beans.

Herman Goelitz Rowland and Lisa Rowland Jelly Belly

Lisa Rowland Brasher and Herman Goelitz Rowland, Sr.

Candy.com: Herm, when your children and grandchildren were young, did you ever think they’d be working at the Jelly Belly Candy Company?

HGR: It wasn’t mandatory for any of my family to join the business, but it’s been great there is interest. We have 10 of us now working in the business. I just want them to be happy in what they do.

Candy.com: Lisa, as executive vice chairman, you’re apprenticing to prepare for leading the company into the next generation of candy making. How do you feel about that next big step?

LRB: It is quite an honor for me to be in this position. Succession planning is very important to every company and we are a family business that currently employs family members from the 4th, 5th, and 6th generation of our candy-making family. Is that cool or what?! We all work in many different areas of the business and that gives us a good finger on the pulse of the company. I am also surrounded by an awesome team of Jelly Belly employees who are very capable and respected in their areas of expertise, which makes my job that much easier.

Herman Goelitz Rowland, Lisa Rowland Brasher, Trevor Brasher Jelly Belly

Three generations of Jelly Belly candy makers: Herm, his daughter Lisa, and Lisa's son Trevor.

Candy.com: What’s it like to not only work with your closest family members, but also ultimately oversee their work?

LRB: Fortunately, we all get along really well. I am sure that there will be times of difficulty, just as there are in any work relationships, but we all seem to communicate well with each other. The expectation for every generation of family members has been that we exceed expectations as an employee. I know my kids feel that I am harder on them than I am on others. That is probably true, but, as I learned as a youngster, many eyes are on us and what we do. We need to set a good example. I also think that being up front and honest with thoughts and feelings is invaluable. A small note hanging on my wall reminds me that the same letters are in the word “Silent” and the word “Listen.” Most of us in our family don’t have a problem speaking our mind, so I want to always keep that in the forefront of my mind. Be quiet, listen, and then talk!

Candy.com: Lisa, did you know early on that you wanted to be a part of the family candy business?

LRB: As youngsters, we did not visit the candy factory often. My dad worked long days that weren’t conducive to having two little girls running around the factory.  But later on, my sister and I occasionally went to the factory with my dad on a weekend or a holiday—and I was totally sold! The smells (yum) of the powdery mist of sugar floating in the air, the sweet smell of milk chocolate, the sight of trays stacked high with candy corn, mellocreme choppers, or chocolate pokies lured me in.

Candy.com: Herm, if you weren’t running the Jelly Belly Candy Company, what would you want to do?

HGR: Design new equipment, probably for the candy industry. Equipment is my first love. Or grow something on a farm and drive a tractor.

Candy.com: What’s your biggest business challenge at the moment?

LRB: I think that our biggest challenge at the moment is similar to the challenges that many companies face nationwide: How can we be the best that we can be with our employees, consumers, vendors, and retailers; continue to produce excellent quality confections and provide superior customer service while keeping our costs contained so that we can be competitive in the market in an economy that all costs are skyrocketing!

Jelly Belly Beans
Candy.com: What’s your most favorite Jelly Belly jelly bean flavor … and least favorite?

HGR: Peach has always been at the top of my list. Can’t think of any I don’t like.

LRB: Currently my favorite flavors are #1 – Red Apple, #2 – Plum, and #3 – Juicy Pear. (Juicy Pear used to be my #1 flavor until Red Apple and Plum were released.) My fourth favorite flavor is Chili Mango. It’s funny because I really don’t like spicy tastes and I can live without mango, too, but I LOVE this flavor. Just the right amount of sweet and spicy. My least favorite bean flavor is cantaloupe. I am also not a fan of Licorice. Funny because it is our #3 flavor in the lineup!

Candy.com: Have you or any of your family members ever submitted a Jelly Belly jelly bean flavor that either got used or shot down?

LRB: Yes, in 1995 we came out with Red Licorice, which I love and had always wanted us to produce. The problem here was that there are two very distinct tastes for Red Licorice.  Unfortunately for me, our team made the taste that is not my favorite brand of red licorice and the rest of the country agreed. Due to less-than-stellar sales, it was discontinued shortly thereafter.

Jelly Belly Peas & Carrots MellocremesCandy.com: I heard that your new Peas & Carrots Mellocremes were a hit at this year’s Winter Fancy Food Show. Why do you think show-goers went nuts over the sweet side dish?

LRB: The retro look is a hot trend right now and our fun can of Peas and Carrots fits the bill perfectly.  They are realistic looking and cute too! Mellocreme flavors of Green Apple and Orange Sherbet put a fun twist on traditional yummy mellocreme candies. Eating your veggies never tasted so good!

Candy.com: Any other new products or Jelly Belly Jelly Bean flavors you’ll be launching at the Sweets & Snacks EXPO this May?
LRB: Jelly Belly is known worldwide for its product innovation and the exciting new confections coming out at the next Sweets & Snacks EXPO this May will not disappoint!  But, we have to keep some surprises for the show.

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Taste

Aroma

Appearance

Price


If you’ve been missing chewy Black Cow caramel candy, I’ve got good news. It’s back—and it’s chewier than ever.

Black Cow Caramel Candy

After a 25-year hiatus, Black Cow—the sister candy to Slo Poke—has officially relaunched in two new formats: 1.5-ounce bars and bite-sized chews. The chocolaty-caramel treat has also undergone a reformulation.

“Originally, Black Cow was a Slo Poke caramel dipped into a compound chocolate,” says Rich Warrell, director of sales and marketing for Classic Caramel, a division of The Warrell Corporation and current manufacturer of Black Cow and Slo Poke brands. “Our version is a firmer, full-flavored caramel with real chocolate in the piece itself—like a much richer Tootsie Roll, which is also a type of a chocolate caramel.”

Slo Poke Bar

Just like Black Cow, Slo Poke will now only be available in bar and bite-sized formats, which is a bit of a bummer if you’re a sucker fan. Rich Warrell did confirm, however, that the recipe for Slo Poke is the same. No sucker stick, same taste, no problem on my end.

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Contest Winner!

Michele Levinski is the winner of the “Guess which classic candy is coming out of retirement?” contest. Michele was the first person to guess Black Cow. (She actually guessed “Chocolate Cow,” but close enough.) As the official winner, Michele will receive a case of Black Cow caramel candy. Congrats Michele and thanks to all who participated. We had more than 275 guesses!
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The history of Slo Poke and Black Cow reads like the resume of a serial job hopper. Both brands have changed manufacturers multiple times before finally landing in Classic Caramel’s facility in Camp Hill, PA.

M.J. Holloway & Co., Beatrice Foods, Leaf Brands, Pittsburgh Food and Beverage Company, and Gilliam Candy all played a part in keeping these two brands alive and well in America. (At one point M.J. Holloway had extended its line to Banana, Orange, Pink, and Purple Cows.)

Black Cow TubThroughout all of the company hopping, a few things have remained the same. Both candies are still wrapped in brown and mustard-yellow packaging and both kept their same nostalgic logos with the rounded sans-serif fonts.

Come to think of it, a Slo Poke and a Black Cow should still last though an entire “Rocky” movie, too.

Black Cow bars and bites are available exclusively at Candy.com. Pre-book now for March 15 ship date!


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19 Feb

Spring Candy! 0

Old man winter is about to go on spring break … and I’ll help the guy pack. If you’re also ready to put your sleds and ski polls in the attic, I put together a fresh dose of spring from Candy.com’s new Easter Candy collections.

I love these Gummy Butterflies and the Holland Egg Mints because they’re not typical Easter candy fare. They’ll also light up an Easter basket or candy dish lickety split.

Butterfly gummies Holland Mint Eggs

Bring on your parties! Candy.com’s Easter bulk candies and foiled chocolates will fill any vessels or color theme you’ve got in mind for a spring dessert table.

Easter Bulk Candy

For gift giving, adorable plush toys, Easter gift baskets and boxes, and snarky chocolate bars make spring a heck of a lot more fun.

Spring Candy Gifts

Here’s to pastel candy crafting, decorating, entertaining, and nibbling on bunny ears this green-grass season!

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Have you ever wondered why it is that when you buy a box or bag of candy containing an assortment of flavors/colors (i.e., Skittles, Dum Dum Pops, gummy bears, salt water taffy, etc.), the ratio of your least favorite flavor/color to favorite seems like 10:1?

For example, when I smuggle in a box of Dots at the movie theater, I feel like I’m eating 10 lime Dots for every cherry.

Dots CandySince it was a slow Saturday afternoon at the Gillerlain corral, I decided to test Murphy’s Law.

I picked up two of each of the following candies: Jujyfruits by Farley’s & Sathers Candy Company (7.8-ounce box); Starburst by Mars Snackfood US (4-ounce box); and Chewy Spree by Wonka (1.7-ounce bag).

I dumped out the candy and started sorting by flavor/color. After much computation (I’m still not using my college calculus), here are my key findings:

Starburst Fruit Chews

- None of the boxes/bags of candies had a uniform number of flavors/colors. (In the photo above, the Starburst box on the left contained seven strawberry pink pieces, the other had two. One bag of Chewy Spree held four cherry red pieces, the other had seven.)

- When comparing like candies, no two boxes/bags had an equal number of pieces. (One box of Jujyfruits contained 80 pieces, the other had 75 pieces.)

- It is possible to strike gold. One of my boxes of Jujyfruits harvested 30 cherry red pieces and only 11 lime greens.

Based on my mind-numbing experiment, it appears to be luck of the draw as to which specific flavors/colors you’re going to get in any one container of candy. And, if weight has everything to do with the number of candy pieces per box or bag, some pieces must be smaller than others.

Bottom line: If you’re smuggling candy into a dark theater, bring a tiny flashlight to navigate around unfavorable flavors and colors. Better yet, smuggle in two boxes for better odds … or bring on the Goobers.

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