Archive for the ‘Nostalgic/Retro’ Category

24 Feb

Good(tze)! 0

The pet project of Goetze’s Candy Company founder August Goetze, Caramel Creams (AKA Bullseyes) have been staving off hunger pangs since 1917. I had vague memories of these chewy, two-tone caramels, (for some reason mostly in school bus related settings) as a kind of lower echelon candy, before I caught up with them earlier today and found out how wrong I was.

While a hotbed of youthful intellectual zeal, many conclusions reached in this environment prove false

True, Caramel Creams aren’t overwhelmingly sweet, and while the sensibilities of my younger self may have taken umbrage with that aspect of the candy, now I can appreciate it. It’s also possible that many of the Caramel Creams I’ve sampled in the past were less than fresh—yes, even candy has an optimal shelf life. Luckily, this was not the case today.

Check that expiration date!

The outer layer of caramel (the retina) is probably what hung me up most as a child. While it’s got a wonderfully thick, chewy texture, it’s also only mildly sweetened, with malty overtones reminiscent of whole-wheat flour. Since I now love bread that isn’t immediately metabolized as sugar, I find this flavor fantastic and refreshingly unique in a confectionery setting. The cream (lens) meanwhile, is a wonderfully sweet fondant (and actually made with real cream), which is vaguely tangy and the perfect accompaniment to the earthier exterior.

Goetze's Scores a big one

Still manufactured in their home city of Baltimore Maryland, Goetze’s Caramel Creams are an All-American snack that are (for a change) actually low-fat, low-sodium and cholesterol free. Get ‘em fresh and I’ll bet you’ll be hooked*!

*Candy.com, like Goetze’s, encourages you to get hooked responsibly.

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in Candy, Nostalgic/Retro, Soft

15 Feb

Everything to Everybody 0

Confection, percussion instrument, energy blast, aphrodisiac, co-signer of the Treaty of Gaudalupe Hidalgo. These little purple (and white) pills have been making people feel “plenty good” for over a century, so why not you?

First: The bad news. Good & Plenty contain wheat flour, making them a no-no for those with wheat allergies or Celiac’s disease (gluten intolerance). Vegans also need not apply since, like many healthy, ruddy-countenanced candies, the pink ones (plentys) are colored with K-Carmine dye, whose red pigment is derived from female Cochineal Beetles.

A lovely specimen

There, now that’s out of the way, on to the good stuff (come on, beetles are neat!)

And they know how to have a good time

Rich in space-age sugars such as Dextrose, Good & Plentys provide the kind of instant energy boost so popular amongst such social elites as athletes and cartoon characters.

These fellows are both, and in the public domain!

Commonly packaged in sturdy, chipboard theater-boxes, the tough-exteriored Good & Plentys rattle appealingly when shaken, as evidenced by the case of “Choo Choo Charlie,” who used Good & Plenty to successfully play at being a railroad engineer for over 20 years.

Last seen here, bravely pushing his engine into the heart of suction-arrow territory

Sweet, salty and sophisticated, the licorice / anise heavy taste and scent of Good & Plenty polled at the top of a recent survey conducted to determine the smells most desirable to women.

Tied with the ever-amorous eu de cucumber

Manufactured consistently since their inception in 1893, Good & Plenty’s haven’t been around so long by accident. Fat-free, kosher certified, and reasonably priced (especially for a licorice confection) it’s easy to see why Good & Plenty have stayed that way!

Check out our Selection!

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in Candy, Kosher, Nostalgic/Retro

10 Feb

How Walt Whitman Wooed 0

With proto versions manufactured in the early 1860’s, NECCO’s venerable Sweethearts Candies are practically as old as love itself. Their earliest ancestors were confections of pressed sugar and flour shaped like scallop shells with amorous messages printed on thin strips of colored paper rolled inside, much like the modern day fortune-cookie. Enterprising chaps that they were, the folks at NECCO (or what would become known as NECCO) kept experimenting with the confection throughout the latter half of the 19th century, eventually designing a process that allowed them to scrawl sweet-nothings directly onto the popular lozenges by way of vegetable dye and tiny felt-pad rollers. Slogans from this era included the ominous: “Married in satin, Love will not be lasting” and “Married in Pink, He will take to drink” as well as the encouraging “Married in white, You have chosen right,” and proved to be a big hoot at the weddin’s, hitchin’s, pledgin’s, sealin’s, and swearnin’s of undyin’ fealty-as-long-as-we-both-shall-have-yon scatter-gun-to-our-backs, so in vogue at the time. By 1902, the prosaic lozenges had evolved into the far more telegraphic Conversation Hearts known today, but included shapes such as baseballs, postcards, horseshoes and watches.

Valentines before Conversation Hearts

As of 2010, NECCO has replaced all its traditional slogans with customer suggestions, revamped the treats’ color and texture and even added some new flavors. How do the changes stack up?

Are they "revolutionary?"

As with the upgraded NECCO Wafers, I’d say pretty well. I was never a huge fan of the taste or texture of Conversation Hearts to begin with, and while I still doubt I would buy them at any other time of the year, I appreciate the positive difference NECCO’s efforts have made. *A short corollary, almost all of the 8 billion conversation hearts produced by Necco annually are sold in the month leading up to Valentines Day.*  The only flavors that remain from the original sextet are Lemon, Grape and Orange, with Wintergreen, Banana, and Cherry replaced by Strawberry, Green Apple and (dun-dun-duh!) Blue Raspberry. I can’t say I miss any of the old flavors too terribly much, and while Blue Raspberry shares the typical “wrung-from-a-scented-marker” taste affecting most confections victimized by the flavor, I was pleasantly surprised by the tartness of green apple (even though it actually tastes more like a golden delicious) and genuinely loved Strawberry for its similarity to the ever amazing pink Starburst. Elsewhere, Orange seemed in fine form with a surprisingly genuine flavor– especially when chewed— though I’m still convinced that Grape contains Dimetapp and Lemon (appropriately now yellow instead of green) a dash of pine-sol and or beefeaters gin. A definite improvement in the texture department meant none of the hearts crunched quite as unapologetically as raw chalk between my teeth, though I couldn’t entirely banish thoughts of Flintstone vitamins from my mind. Since I enjoyed my Conversation Hearts “En Español!” (another fairly recent innovation) I can’t comment on the results of the 100% consumer-chosen slogans in English, but can certainly say I enjoyed being literally romanced via such old-world posies as “Beunos Dias,” “Mi Joya,” “Paz,” “Dulce” and the apparently misprinted “llamo me.” It seems even the pros get nervous confessing their deepest feelings.

Sweets to the Sweet.”

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in Candy, Nostalgic/Retro, Reviews

8 Feb

A Little Talk About Henrys 0

Tom Henry, O. Henry, Henry the flirt, Henry “Hank” Aaron, Henry “H-Rod” Rodriguez. Many a fine Henry has been implicated in the forging of this historic bar, and though Juan Sánchez “Henry” Villa-Lobos Ramírez may claim in Highlander that, “There can be only one,” it’s my personal belief that a candy bar, like a litter of kittens, may have a whole lotta poppas.

Holding this to be true, Tom Henry of Arkansas City, Kansas (AKA “con sarn it!”) is certainly one, having sold the rights to his brilliantly titled signature bar “Tom Henry,” which he had launched in 1919, to Williamson Candy Company of Chicago in 1920. By all accounts, Williamson didn’t alter the bar’s formula but seemed to feel that the name “Tom” wasn’t swinging enough to spin the dough. Nestle (the bar’s current U.S. distributor) claims that the name “Oh Henry!” was inspired by a refrain often uttered in the Williamson factory in the early 20’s, by female employees enjoying the attentions of a local flirt named “Henry,” who used to hang around performing small favors. Others speculate that the name was chosen because of its similarity to the pen name of popular early 20th century American writer Sydney Porter, better known as “O. Henry.” It was precisely this sense of mystery that Williamson employee John Glossinger was able to cultivate and capitalize on when, of his own volition and despite the skepticism of Williamson, he waged an advertising campaign in support of “Oh Henry!,” which consisted of him placing bumper stickers on cars featuring the confection’s name and nothing else. As they’re wont when puzzled, Americans bought on and bought hard, “Oh Henry!” flourished and John Glossinger got a cookie and a pat on the head. The elaborate mythology of the bar only increased when it became associated, first with the great Hank Aaron and later with the pretty-good Henry Rodriguez. The practice of throwing “Oh Henry!” bars onto the field following one of “H-Rod’s” homeruns was famously adopted at his home stadiums, until an incident at Wrigley field in 2000– which resulted in left field being somewhat flooded by the bars– led to the arrest of four “Oh Henry!” wielding super-fans, largely discouraging the tradition.

History; so far I’ve written a long-winded and inept digest of the main points of interest for this unusually storied candy, and if you’re still reading you probably want to know how the thing tastes already. In an unusual bit of prescience and reflexivity, here goes. Firstly, if you’re purchasing the bar in the U.S., you’re actually getting two little bars. These are comprised of vanilla fudge, caramel and finely chopped peanuts coated in milk chocolate. Dense and compact, your jaw is going to get a workout chewing it into digestibility; better to savor the flavors. While the vanilla fudge falls victim to the plague of “I don’t taste vanilla in that vanilla-itis” affecting so many otherwise healthy candies, this can be forgiven due to the strength of the caramel and peanuts. Smooth and crunchy in all the right places and vibrantly flavored with a blend of sweet and smokey, I was (not unhappily) convinced that the fudge was peanut-flavored before my research again shamed my amateur palette. The milk chocolate coating then, doesn’t have to do much except look appetizing and melt in the mouth, and that’s exactly what it does, but I can’t help feeling the bar would be enriched immeasurably if it had ambitions to go above and beyond serving as window dressing. Some nice bars, overall. True to their heritage, the story of the “Oh Henry!” also has an optimistic twist ending. See, “Oh Henry” is manufactured by HERSHEY in Canada and boasts a different recipe, look, style and taste. Two bars, separated by the great Williamson buyout of ‘84 and living parallel lives across national lines. Surely someday the chance of their glad reformation will be retrieved from the realm of the great “what if.”

In the meantime…

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