Archive for the ‘Nostalgic/Retro’ Category

Have you ever wondered why it is that when you buy a box or bag of candy containing an assortment of flavors/colors (i.e., Skittles, Dum Dum Pops, gummy bears, salt water taffy, etc.), the ratio of your least favorite flavor/color to favorite seems like 10:1?

For example, when I smuggle in a box of Dots at the movie theater, I feel like I’m eating 10 lime Dots for every cherry.

Dots CandySince it was a slow Saturday afternoon at the Gillerlain corral, I decided to test Murphy’s Law.

I picked up two of each of the following candies: Jujyfruits by Farley’s & Sathers Candy Company (7.8-ounce box); Starburst by Mars Snackfood US (4-ounce box); and Chewy Spree by Wonka (1.7-ounce bag).

I dumped out the candy and started sorting by flavor/color. After much computation (I’m still not using my college calculus), here are my key findings:

Starburst Fruit Chews

- None of the boxes/bags of candies had a uniform number of flavors/colors. (In the photo above, the Starburst box on the left contained seven strawberry pink pieces, the other had two. One bag of Chewy Spree held four cherry red pieces, the other had seven.)

- When comparing like candies, no two boxes/bags had an equal number of pieces. (One box of Jujyfruits contained 80 pieces, the other had 75 pieces.)

- It is possible to strike gold. One of my boxes of Jujyfruits harvested 30 cherry red pieces and only 11 lime greens.

Based on my mind-numbing experiment, it appears to be luck of the draw as to which specific flavors/colors you’re going to get in any one container of candy. And, if weight has everything to do with the number of candy pieces per box or bag, some pieces must be smaller than others.

Bottom line: If you’re smuggling candy into a dark theater, bring a tiny flashlight to navigate around unfavorable flavors and colors. Better yet, smuggle in two boxes for better odds … or bring on the Goobers.

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It was Valentine’s candy craft day at my house this morning, which led to a sampling of Milk Duds, BB Bats, Bit-O-Honey, Reese’s Pieces, Good & Plenty, and Goobers all before 10 a.m. Sure beats a bowl of Cheerios.

My kids and I started with a brainstorming session and came up with a handful of candy-related sweet sayings, including …

- I’m about to tell you a Whopper. I love you!
- I am such a Goober when I’m around you.
- You’re one Hot Tamale in my book.
- Valentine, let’s Take 5 in New York [Peppermint Patty] City!
- Luv U to [Reese's] Pieces.
- I always have a Good & Plenty time with you.
- Kiss my Whatchamacallit! (All credit goes to neighbor Jenny for this one)

From there, we cut out red hearts from poster board and applied our “sweet nothings” and candy to paper. Snap!

Here are three that my kids made with a teeny-tiny bit of motherly input (see heart #3) …

If you're not into playing "hard to get," this is the Valentine for you.

This box of Milk Duds is empty because we had no self control while candy crafting.

"My kids" made this on behalf of my husband. Wink.

Hope our humble hearts inspire you to create homemade candy greetings for your own sweeties!

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Right on the heels of my last post about 2010 candy product launches, a new candy bar has come to market: Bosco Milk Chocolate Bars. And, yes, it’s the same “Bosco” as Bosco brand Chocolate Syrup.

If you’re not familiar with Bosco Chocolate Syrup, it’s a brand that’s been around since 1928. Dick Van Dyke and Virginia Graham hawked Bosco back in the ’50s:

In 1960, Bosco Chocolate Syrup made a cameo in Alfred Hitchcock’s thriller, Psycho. The syrup was used as “blood” in Janet Leigh’s unforgettable shower scene.

Bosco Syrup also appeared on Laverne & Shirley (Bosco chocolate milk was Squiggy’s favorite drink) and Seinfeld. In the Nov. 1995 “The Secret Code” episode of Seinfeld, George Costanza reveals that his ATM PIN is “Bosco.”

Scott Sanders, vice president of the family-owned Bosco Products, Inc., says his dad, Steve, was contacted by Shrek 2 personnel to get permission to use the “I love Bosco” jingle. It made the 2004 film’s soundtrack.

And now, in the new year, big and small screens have a new prop star: the 3.5-ounce Bosco Milk Chocolate Bar.

___________________________________________________________________
Free Bosco Products Giveaway!
Bosco Milk Chocolate Bars are available exclusively on Candy.com through January! Pre-orders are available now; first shipment begins Mon.,  Jan. 10.

Try a bar and tell the Candy.com community what you think. EVERYONE who comments on ANY Bosco product (fond Bosco memories, anyone?) will be entered to win a Bosco T-shirt and a Bosco Variety Pack. So … spill your thoughts!
___________________________________________________________________

According to Paul Pruett, CEO of the Praim Group and manager of Bosco’s chocolate brand, the new all-natural milk chocolate bars are formulated to taste like Bosco Chocolate Syrup.

Unlike the syrup, however, the milk chocolate bars aren’t vitamin-fortified. Scott says fortifying the bars was a consideration, but that it presented technical complications and didn’t quite match the needs of the broader target market the bars are expected to attract.

Bosco Chocolate Syrup was originally created by a Camden, NJ-based physician to help with digestion. The extra thick syrup was later marketed as a “milk amplifier” and included iron and Vitamin D. Today, the product (which Scott describes as “fudge-like”) is positioned as an all-natural ice cream topper and milk syrup, and is fortified with B Vitamins.

At brick-and-mortar retail outlets, Scott and Paul both say the ultimate goal is for Bosco Syrup and Bosco Milk Chocolate Bars to be merchandised together, but they acknowledge the fact that the buyer for those two categories isn’t always the same person. It’s a big hurdle, but Paul says, “We’re bullish on that partnership.”

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Described as “the true blue Willy Wonka,” “eccentric,” an “oddball,” and a “savant,” David Klein, I recently found out, is all of these things, and more.

David Klein is the inventor of Jelly Belly jelly beans, and he’s got quite a story. Last week, I talked with David about his new documentary, Candyman: The David Klein Story, produced by his son and daughter-in-law. I’d been hoping to see this film, which chronicles David’s Jelly Belly journey, so I felt like I won a first prize when he offered to send me a copy.

So far, I’ve watched this feature-length film twice. It’s quirky and a little addicting. Ellia Kassoff, the owner of Astro Pops, LLC, says he’s watched it four times.

I am drawn to this film because David is a walking candy Wikipedia. If I were writing a historical piece on the industry, he’d be the first guy I’d call. Ask David a question about a candy brand and he’ll tell you when it was invented, the company that manufactured it, when the brand changed hands, and the people behind it all.

I am also drawn to this film because of David’s character. He is wacky (he writes all of his notes on paper plates) and would probably drive you nuts if he were your dad, but he’s got a heart of gold and an entrepreneurial spirit that trumps The Donald’s.

I’m no film critic, so I won’t go into details about the film (see the Candy Professor’s review), but I will share a few good takeaways I got from my call with the Candyman:

- From the beginning, David sold jelly beans as individual flavors. “If I only sold an assorted box, I’d only have one spot in the store. By forcing retailers to buy single flavors, I got much more shelf space.”

- David got the idea for intensely and realistically flavored jelly beans while watching “Happy Days.” He got the idea for the brand name, “Jelly Belly” while watching “Sanford and Son.”

- David’s all-time favorite candy is not jelly beans. It’s actually Junior Mints (and Queen Anne’s Caramellos, but they are extinct).

- David wishes the manufacturer of Junior Mints (Tootsie Roll Industries), would come out with a Junior Mint peppermint patty.

- David is working on a new line of jelly beans that he says will “revolutionize the jelly bean business.” If all goes to plan, the new beans will roll out before Easter 2011.

- The outlandish rhinestone cowboy outfit that David wore on “The Mike Douglas Show” set him back $4,760.

Candyman: The David Klein Story is now playing on The Documentary Channel, which is primarily available through satellite television services DISH Network (Channel 197) and DIRECTV (Channel 267).

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