Archive for the ‘Candy Tips’ Category

One very simple way to incorporate a color theme into a candy buffet is to layer candy in glass vessels.

 

Candy Layering

 

In the example above, layers of 1-inch green and white gumballs are coupled with white Sixlets and kiwi green foiled chocolate balls. White candy is always a great choice as it pairs with other colors perfectly.

This combination would work just as well at a neutral baby shower as it would at a Christmas tree-trimming party or St. Patrick’s Day celebration.

Set up takes minutes vs. hours. Plus, beautiful candy is a great conversation piece, and it can be used as a dessert item as well as a take-home treat.

 

Unexpected purple and yellow candies are a beautiful combination for a candy buffet.

 

With candy layering, you can color-match any party theme.

For a wedding with an unexpected color combination like lavender, yellow, and white, you can layer yellow and white gumballs, and accent with purple foiled chocolates, and grape unicorn lollipops. Just a few of these candy-filled glass containers will complement a cake, cupcakes, and other wedding pastries.

Candy combinations are endless, which can make buying overwhelming. A great place to start is SweetWorks’ Celebration candy collection. Each candy in this line is developed specifically for mixing and matching. Another great starting point is the candy by color page on Candy.com.

Use SweetWorks Celebration product line as a base, and incorporate chocolate bars, truffles, jelly beans, gummi candies, hard candy balls, and lollipops.

 

Valentine Candy Buffet

 

In the Valentine-themed candy buffet photo above, foiled chocolate hearts are layered with white gumballs. The focal point is a single red and white swirled lollipop centered in a glass jar filled with white Sixlets.

The jar brimming with hot pink, white, and red Sixlets ties the color scheme together. Only four types of candy are used in this candy buffet, but the color combinations make it look as if there is more.

Get inspired and send us photos of any candy layering that you have done! We’d love to see and share your work on the blog. (Send your photos and contact information to media@candy.com.)

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The folks at Weight Watchers are all about “no forbidden” foods and even post on their Web site that “there’s plenty of room for treats and extras.”

With a point system that takes into account height, weight, age, gender, and exercise level, daily points average between 20 and 40, and can rack up pretty quickly depending on what’s consumed.

To see the point levels candy generates, I scoured the Web for candy point lists and created a compilation of everyday and Easter candy (see below) from blog1, blog2, and blog3.

Interestingly, 35 Jelly Belly jelly beans equal a mere 3 points, while 10 Hershey’s Kisses put 7 points on the board. Most fun-sized bars fall between  2 and 2.5 points. Not bad if you can stop at two!

Weight Watchers Candy Points

Easter Candy
Brach’s Robin Eggs (6 pieces) = 4.5 points
Cadbury Caramel Egg (1 egg)  = 5 points
Cadbury Chocolate Egg (1 egg) = 4.5 points
Cadbury Creme Egg (1 egg)  = 4 points
Cadbury Mini Eggs (12  eggs) = 4.5 points
Dove Solid Milk Chocolate Bunny (6 oz.) 1/4 of the bunny  = 6 points
Hershey’s Candy-Coated Milk Chocolate Eggs (4 eggs) = 2.5 points
Jelly Belly Jelly Beans (35 pieces) = 3 points
Lindt Lindor Mini Eggs (3 eggs) = 2.5 points
Milky Way Egg (1 egg) = 5 points
Peeps (3 pieces) = 3 points
Snickers Egg (1 egg) = 4 points

Everyday Candy

Abba Zaba (1 fun-size bar) = 1.5 points
Almond Joy (2 snack-size bars) = 4 points
Almond Roca (3 pieces) = 5.5 points
Andes Thin Mints (8 pieces) = 5 points
Atomic Fireballs (3 pieces) = 1.5 points
Baby Ruth (2 fun-size bars) = 4 points
Big Hunk (1 fun-size bar) = 1.5 points
Bit-O-Honey (6 pieces) = 4 points
Blow Pop (1 pop) = 1.5 points
Butterfinger (2 fun-size bars) = 4 points
Cadbury Crème Egg, 1 egg (1.3 oz) = 4 points
Candy Corn (22 pieces) = 3 points
Caramello (2 fun-size bars) = 4 points
Dots Fun Size (2 fun-size boxes) = 2 points
Dove Dark Chocolate (5 pieces) = 5 points
Dove Milk Chocolate (5 pieces) = 5.5 points
Dubble Bubble Gum (2 pieces) = 1 point
Dum Dum Lollipops (3 pops) = 1.5 points
Good & Plenty (33 pieces) = 3 points
Heath Bar (5 fun-size bars) = 6 points
Gummy Bears (14 pieces) = 3 points
Hershey’s Almond Bar (2 fun-size bars) = 5 points
Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Bar (2 fun-size bars) = 5 points
Hershey’s Kisses (10 Kisses) = 7 points
Hot Tamales (1 fun-size box) = 1 point
Jelly Belly Jelly Beans (35 pieces) = 3 points
Jolly Rancher Hard Candy (2 pieces) = 1 point
Kit Kat (2 fun-size bars) = 6 points
Life Savers 4 fruit-flavored candies = 1.5 points
LOOK Bar (1 fun-size bar) = 1.5 points
M&M’s Peanut (1 fun-size pack) = 2 points
M&M’s Plain (1 fun-size pack) = 2 points
Marshmallow Peeps (5 Peeps) = 3 points
Mary Janes (6 pieces) = 3.5 points
Mike and Ike (1 fun-size box) = 1 point
Milk Duds (4 fun-size boxes) = 4 points
Milky Way (2 fun-size bars) = 4 points
Mounds (2 fun-size bars) = 4 points
Necco Sweethearts (1 fun-size box 1 oz.) = 2.5 points
Nestle Crunch (2 fun-size bars) = 4 points
O’Henry (2 fun-size bars) = 5 points
Pay Day (1 fun-size bar) = 3 points
Raisinettes (3 fun-size boxes) = 4 points
Reese’s Mini Peanut Butter Cups (5 pieces) = 5 points
Reese’s Peanut Butter Eggs (4 eggs) = 4 points
Reese’s Pieces (51 pieces) = 5 points
Skittles (27 pieces) = 2 points
Smarties (4 rolls) = 2 points
Snickers (2 fun-size bars) = 4 points
Snickers Eggs (1 egg 1.2 oz) = 4 points
Sour Patch Kids (16 pieces) = 3 points
Spree (15 pieces) = 2 points
Starburst (8 pieces) = 3.5 points
Sugar Babies (2 fun-size pouches) = 4.5 points
SweeTarts (15 pieces) = 2 points
3 Musketeers (2 fun-size bars) = 3 points
Tootsie Caramel Apple Pop (1 lollipop) = 1.5 points
Tootsie Pop (1 lollipop) = 1 point
Tootsie Roll (2 snack bars) = 2 points
Tootsie Roll Midgees (6 pieces) = 4 points
Trident Sugarless Gum (1 stick) = 0 points
Twix (1 fun-size bar) = 2 points
Twizzler (1 fun-size bar) = 4 points
Warhead Sours (5 pieces) = 1 point
Werthers Original (3 pieces) = 1 point
Whoppers Malted Milk Balls (2 fun-size boxes) = 5 points
York Peppermint Patties (3 fun-size patties) = 3 points

If you have candy items and corresponding points to add to this list, please comment!

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ChrismasOrnamentCakePops

 

Joanne MacLennan of Merry Poppins is back on our blog today with a Christmas treat! Her brilliantly colored Ornament Cake Pops are a great addition to cookie baking this weekend.  A perfect project to make with kids of all ages, and a wonderful gift to bring to holiday hosts!

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I love decorating my Christmas Tree with the memories of the past.  Each ornament seems to carry with it an emotion locked inside for you to physically touch as you place it on the tree.  This is wondrous to me.  Now that I am a little crazed about small round edible balls, I thought it would be fun to create some ornaments for your table too!

Here’s what you’ll need:

• 1 Cake mix
Candy melts (red and white here)
Lollipop sticks
SweetWorks Sugar pearls, Sixlets, edible glitter, and nonpareils
• Wax paper
• Parchment paper or paper to catch falling glitter
• Flat plate or cookie sheet
• Microwaveable bowls for melting the candy melts
• Spoons
• Small plastic bag with the corner cut out to use as a tip for details, OR a decorating set with various tips
• Styrofoam block to stand sticks while waiting for them to set
• Bowls to catch falling sprinkles and candy

Ingredients

 

Here’s the how-to:
For the complete directions on how to make a cake pop up to the dipping stage, please refer to my last post on MyCandyCrafts.com , and complete up to the end of step 8.

Below is my basic ring cake pop.  I first made three rings of melts, and then sprinkled them with red nonpariels.  Let this set for a few minutes. Then make three more rings between the red ones and sprinkle with green nonpariels. Then, carefully dip the silver Sixlet into the melted chocolate and set on the top of your cake pop.

RedGreenPop
This cake pop was dipped, and immediately sprinkled with red edible glitter.  Make sure you sprinkle over a clean sheet of paper for this one.  Once you are done it is easy to bend the paper and let the glitter slide back into the container. Again, complete the cake pop with a silver sixlet on the top.

RedPop

I love snowflakes!

I first dipped my cake pop in red melts and let it set.  Then, after dumping a spoon of melted candy melts into a small plastic bag and snipping off the tip, I drew little lines crossing each other.  Three to be exact.  Like an X with one more line through it.  Then grab the glitter and sprinkle.  Any mistakes you thought you had will disappear in the sparkles.

I dipped the cake pop in red melts again and let it set.  Using my little plastic bag with melts in it, I drew a line from the top of the cake pop to the bottom, and came right back up a little but away from my first line.  Then I filled in the space with melts and quickly sprinkled with gold edible glitter.  Continue around the ball until it is complete.

Oh!  And don’t forget the silver Sixlet on the top!

SnowflakePop

This green striped cake pop was done the same way as the red and gold ball, but I dipped it in white melts, and then never filled in the spaces that were left between the lines I drew from the top to the bottom.  I love this one.

Top off with a silver Sixlet.

Green_CakePop_Ornament

All complete!  A colorful array of eye catching treats!

Time to clean up!  Being creative in my house means there is a mess at the end.  ;)

ChristmasOrnamentCakePop-Mix2

ChristmasOrnamentCakePops_Mix

 

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Sweetopia's Candylicious Pink and White Gingerbread House

It’s gingerbread house season and we’ve got tips from a master gingerbread house builder, Marian Poirer, founder of the tutorial-style baking blog, Sweetopia. She is also a guest speaker at this weekend’s Mixed Conference with Duff Goldman!

Marian takes gingerbread houses to new levels with her clever use of candy, foolproof recipes, and templates.

Her sweet pink gingerbread house (above) features pink rock candy sticks as the evergreen trees, pink Sixlets as the siding, and Necco Wafers and Shimmer Pink Bubble Gumballs as the rooftop. Simple ideas that you can easily build on at home.

Marian’s red and white gingerbread house (below) turns swirl pops into trees, and gumballs and Sixlets into Seuss-like shrubs.

Sweetopia's Candylicious Red and White Gingerbread House

 

We had a chance to talk with Marian about her gingerbread houses and gather a few tips. Here’s the abridged version …

Candy.com:  Your gingerbread houses are works of art. What got you interested in making them?

Marian Poirier - SweetopiaMarian: My fascination with making sweets began nine years ago, when a illness prevented me from engaging in physical fitness; what I had previously spent much of my free time doing. I needed to keep busy, and as gingerbread houses had always charmed me, I decided to try my hand at one. The first house I made wasn’t the prettiest, but I was hooked! The more I made them, the more I found there was to try. Thank goodness the illness only lasted about six months, and I’m grateful for it now, because it led me to find one of my favorite hobbies.

 

Candy.com:  What is your absolute favorite candy to use on a gingerbread house? (We love your use of pink rock candy sticks!)

Marian:  Candy canes first, and gumballs come a close second. Oh, and I do love the rock candy sticks, too! They have this pretty, kind of ‘candy gem’ look, and can easily be matched to any color theme.

 

Candy.com:  In your opinion, what’s the trickiest part to creating a gingerbread house?

Marian:  I would have to say putting the walls together and the roof on. As long as you’ve got a really good royal icing (nice and thick), that will do wonders in making the process much easier. Until I found the recipe I use now, I went through a few frustrating experiences.

 

Candy.com:  Do you have a rule of thumb for about how much candy to buy per small-sized and/or large-sized house?

Marian: It depends on the style I’m going for. If I’m making a house that I’d like to have a bit more of a realistic look, I’m a little more choosy and sparse with the candy. If I’m making a fun, whimsical type of gingerbread house, like the pink-themed one in this post, I pile on the candy! It’s always good to buy a little extra, as oftentimes I’m not sure how much I’ll need until I begin decorating. Plus, that way my husband and I can snack a bit, without being worried that there won’t be enough to finish the house! ;-)

Sweetopia's Traditional Gingerbread House

 

For more tips, check out Marian’s blog post Gingerbread House Ideas and video Making a Gingerbread House.

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