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Move over Benjamin Moore. Candy by color is all the rage.

Several manufacturers have jumped on board with this new, colorized way to buy candy, including Spangler with its single-color Dum Dum Pops and Saf-T-Pops; Albanese with gummy bears in most any color imaginable; Adams & Brooks with Unicorn and Whirly Pops now available in 10 individual colors; and SweetWorks with Sixlets, Candy Pearls, gumballs, and Foil Hearts and Foil Ball chocolates in a range of colors that all match.

Bottom line, the candy industry has become heaven for event planners and consumers who are color-matching for weddings and theme parties.

Here’s a look at some of the newest candies to hit Candy.com in single colors (click on each image for more details). Dig in! …

Milk Chocolate Coins

Sticklettes Hard Candy Sticks

Fruit Sours

Marshmallows

Hard Candies

 

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31 May

Candy Doodles! 0

What happens when you mix a handful of kids with candy, paper, and Sharpie pens?

Nope. Not a super sweet food fight, permanent graffiti, or paper spit balls. Nothing destructive like that.

Instead, think Candy Doodles.

What?!

Candy Doodles are an easy, fun project for kids’ parties, rainy days, art classes, and when you need a valid reason to sample a wide range of candy.

Here’s what you need:

Candy Doodle Ingredients

1. Colorful candies in obvious geometric shapes like M&M’s, Dots, and Good & Plenty.

2. White Paper or colored or drawing paper. Anything goes.

3. Sharpie pens  I found that Ultra Fine Sharpie pens work best. Of course, washable pens are perfectly fine to use, but I have an affinity toward Sharpies and their, um, sharpness. (Call me crazy, because my kids are known for writing on things other than paper.)

Here’s the how-to:

This is where imaginations should run wild. Let kids of all ages place candies on paper and start scribbling around each pieces to create animals, faces, insects, flowers, cartoon characters, landscapes, whatever.

When the scribbling is done, place a small piece of double-stick tape on each piece of candy to hold it in place … or skip the tape and eat the sweets. In this rare instance, body parts are totally replaceable and interchangeable.

Inspiration: (these candy doodles were made by an 11-year-old who shares my same last name)

Start Candy Doodling at your house … and send us photos of your masterpieces! (E-mail photos to Sue@Candy.com.) We’ll post your photos here and on our Facebook and Pinterest pages to create the world’s first Candy Doodle Gallery!

Need more inspiration? Check out Ed Emberley’s Funprint Drawing Books.  This author/artist is the king of simple, yet clever doodles.

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Let the fireworks begin. In honor of Memorial Day, Flag Day, and 4th of July, we bring you a host of red, white, and blue confections to sweeten your summer BBQs, parades, and patriotic parties.

Enjoy all of your All-American summer celebrations!

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Have you ever known someone for a while, and later discovered one of their secret talents? Like, learning that a coworker sews amazing mens’ suits at night, or finding out that your retired neighbor happens to be a pool shark and travels to Vegas to compete. I love when this kind of stuff unfolds.

Last week at the Sweets & Snacks EXPO in Chicago, I came across a “Candy Never Goes Out of Style” exhibit. It was a display of couture dresses, jewelry, high-heeled pumps, and a Louis XVI chair all made out of candy wrappers and individual pieces of candy.

Exhibit A:


Turns out the dresses and accessories were created by Terese McDonald, owner of Candyality candy shops in Chicago, along with several of her staff members, siblings, and sister-in-law. The Louis XVI “sweet seat” was made by Beth Kimmerle, candy historian and author. Both Terese and Beth are friends of Candy.com, and neither came clean with their hidden talents until last week.

Terese says the “Skittles Riddles” dress (above) took her employee, Ashley Reinsmith, about 15 hours to make. (Skittles Riddles got lots of buzz at the Sweets & Snacks EXPO, winning the NCA’s Most Innovative New Product Award in the non-chocolate category.)

The matching Skittles Riddles high heels scream “Katy Perry!” …


Exhibit B:

According to Terese, the Jelly Belly Wedding Dress took the most amount of time to design and bring to life … about 50 hours. (That may have topped the time it took Sarah Burton of Alexander McQueen to create Kate Middleton’s wedding dress!) The bodice and boning accents were made with Vanilla Jelly Belly jelly beans.

Terese says two of her team members worked diligently on the Jelly Belly dress in the middle of her new Water Tower Chicago store location, while customers watched the progress.


Exhibit C:

The vibrant Wm. Wrigley Jr. 5 Gum Dress was made by Terese’s sister-in-law. Terese comes from a family of seven children and says all of her siblings and her sister-in-law have creative and artistic backgrounds. The talent pool runs deep! Terese says she and two of her sisters caught the fashion design bug two years ago when they collaborated on their first candy wrapper dress.

“We constantly study all of the current fashion trends and fashionable people, and make an inspiration board to get us going. Each dress is different as it expresses the vision of the artist,” says Terese.


Exhibit D:

Inspiration by J.Lo? This M&M’s Dress features a boho chic hat and rows and rows of wrappers cut like petals.


Exhibit E:


The summery tangerine dress made with Goetze’s Classic Vanilla Cow Tale wrappers took Terese and her crew about 36 hours to craft. The neckline features unwrapped Goetze’s Caramel Creams. (Yum!)

When asked about what happens with all the candy that gets unwrapped, Terese says, “Most companies donate the wrappers for our dresses, but from time to time, we do end up with vats of unwrapped candy. We recycle that candy because we do so many art projects in our stores. We don’t like to throw anything away.”


Exhibit F:

Beth Kimmerle’s antique Louis XVI chair was covered in retro candies like Tootsie Rolls, red licorice wheels, candy dots, Necco Wafers, and Pez. It was, by far, the sweetest seat in the house.

To learn more about the dresses and accessories that debuted on the Sweets & Snacks Expo runway, as well as Candyality’s upcoming candy fashion events, click here.

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