JackandSarah

This just in at Candy.com: Exclusive (and totally fun) giant candy masks and photo booth props!

All of the lollipops are made by hand in Weymouth, Mass., at the Melville Candy Company.

Masks

They’re perfect for photo booths at weddings, pirate parties (check out the Pirate Beard below), birthday party favors, costume accessories, Instagram and Facebook posts, and a zillion other things.

Here’s the best part: You can win a set of our 12-piece Candy Photo Booth Props + a Giant Candy Mask (Pirate Beard, Santa’s Beard, Red Lips, Pig Nose, Skull, Mustache, Bow Tie, or Mardi Gras Masquerade Mask) … and appear on Candy.com with the masks!

It’s simple to enter!  Just answer this question after this post or on our Facebook page:

How would you use any of Candy.com’s new Candy Masks/Photo Props?

The people with the most creative answers (keep ‘em clean!) win … and will be invited (arm-twisted!) to send us photos posing with the pops for post on Candy.com and our Facebook page. FUN!

Winners will be notified late next week.

Let your creativity run wild and thanks in advance for participating!

GoodPirate_2

SarahClown

Tim_Santa

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Sweetopia's Candylicious Pink and White Gingerbread House

It’s gingerbread house season and we’ve got tips from a master gingerbread house builder, Marian Poirer, founder of the tutorial-style baking blog, Sweetopia. She is also a guest speaker at this weekend’s Mixed Conference with Duff Goldman!

Marian takes gingerbread houses to new levels with her clever use of candy, foolproof recipes, and templates.

Her sweet pink gingerbread house (above) features pink rock candy sticks as the evergreen trees, pink Sixlets as the siding, and Necco Wafers and Shimmer Pink Bubble Gumballs as the rooftop. Simple ideas that you can easily build on at home.

Marian’s red and white gingerbread house (below) turns swirl pops into trees, and gumballs and Sixlets into Seuss-like shrubs.

Sweetopia's Candylicious Red and White Gingerbread House

 

We had a chance to talk with Marian about her gingerbread houses and gather a few tips. Here’s the abridged version …

Candy.com:  Your gingerbread houses are works of art. What got you interested in making them?

Marian Poirier - SweetopiaMarian: My fascination with making sweets began nine years ago, when a illness prevented me from engaging in physical fitness; what I had previously spent much of my free time doing. I needed to keep busy, and as gingerbread houses had always charmed me, I decided to try my hand at one. The first house I made wasn’t the prettiest, but I was hooked! The more I made them, the more I found there was to try. Thank goodness the illness only lasted about six months, and I’m grateful for it now, because it led me to find one of my favorite hobbies.

 

Candy.com:  What is your absolute favorite candy to use on a gingerbread house? (We love your use of pink rock candy sticks!)

Marian:  Candy canes first, and gumballs come a close second. Oh, and I do love the rock candy sticks, too! They have this pretty, kind of ‘candy gem’ look, and can easily be matched to any color theme.

 

Candy.com:  In your opinion, what’s the trickiest part to creating a gingerbread house?

Marian:  I would have to say putting the walls together and the roof on. As long as you’ve got a really good royal icing (nice and thick), that will do wonders in making the process much easier. Until I found the recipe I use now, I went through a few frustrating experiences.

 

Candy.com:  Do you have a rule of thumb for about how much candy to buy per small-sized and/or large-sized house?

Marian: It depends on the style I’m going for. If I’m making a house that I’d like to have a bit more of a realistic look, I’m a little more choosy and sparse with the candy. If I’m making a fun, whimsical type of gingerbread house, like the pink-themed one in this post, I pile on the candy! It’s always good to buy a little extra, as oftentimes I’m not sure how much I’ll need until I begin decorating. Plus, that way my husband and I can snack a bit, without being worried that there won’t be enough to finish the house! ;-)

Sweetopia's Traditional Gingerbread House

 

For more tips, check out Marian’s blog post Gingerbread House Ideas and video Making a Gingerbread House.

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Sunflower Candy Cake Pops
Joanne MacLennan, a talented cake pop designer from Nova Scotia and guest blogger at our sister site, MyCandyCrafts.com, agreed to create a special fall-themed DIY cake pop for the Candy.com blog.

We were thrilled because her work is beautiful (see all of Joanne’s work at her blog, Merry Poppins.) Make one of Joanne’s creations and you will be an instant pop star at your next party!

- – - – - -

Sunflowers represent fall in my mind.  The tall stocks and bright yellow petals are stunning.  Ever spend hours as a kid picking out the seeds in the middle?  Bring the sunflower field to your table with these sunflower cake pops that are sure to bring a smile to your guests!

Here’s what you’ll need:

• One Cake mix
• Homemade or store-bought frosting
• Candy melts
• Lollipop sticks
• Nonpareils, sugar pearls, and edible glitter
Egg Nog Candy Corn (with the tips broken off)
• Wax paper
• Flat plate or cookie sheet
• Microwaveable bowls for melting the candy melts
• Spoons
• Small plastic bag with the corner cut out to use as a tip for details, OR a    decorating set with various tips
• Styrofoam block to stand sticks while waiting for cake pops to set
• Bowls to catch falling sprinkles

 

Here’s the how-to:

Before you start dipping your cake pops, break off the first little end of the candy corn.

Egg Nog Candy Corn

For the complete directions on how to make a cake pop up to the dipping stage, please refer to my last post on MyCandyCrafts.com , and complete up to the end of step 8.

Cake Pops Balls

Cake Pops with sticks

Dipping cake pops in chocolate

Once the cake pop is completely covered with melted chocolate, tap off the extra, and tip the cake pop to the side.   Place the first candy corn about ¾ of the way from the bottom of the cake pop, and hold it in place until it stays.  DO NOT let yourself be in a hurry with these guys.

Insert candy corn into cake pop

Place the next candy right beside the first; hold it there a moment, and then repeat until you have gone all the way around.  The candy corn are heavy, so GO SLOW.  They want to slide right off the pop and land your lap.  I promise.

Your chocolate on the cake pop will set before you complete the circle.  Just dip the broken end into the melts and place it on the pop, again holding it for a moment.

Continue inserting candy corn into cake pop

Once you complete the circle of candy corn, place your cake pop in your stand to set and start another one.  Once I finish all the flowers with the candy corn I go back and do all of the flower centers.

Sunflower Candy Cake Pop

For the centers I made several designs.  First, slightly warm the melts in the microwave.  I used a small plastic bag and dropped a few tablespoons of chocolate into the corner.  By snipping just a little bit off the corner of the bag, I have now created a tip that will control the amount of melt that comes out.   I love this part!

On the top of the flower I made rings of chocolate around the inside edge, and then sprinkled them with black non-pareils.  If you are going to make a center with more than one candy, do one section at a time so that the candies do not spread onto a section where you do not want them to be.  Any mistakes you think you made with the chocolate will magically disappear once you sprinkle on the edible glitter or other candies.

Sunflower Cake Pops

Then I warmed my melts again, dropping some into my small bag, and did some swirls and zig zags on the bottoms of the cake pops.  You can practice on wax paper first if you have an idea in mind.

Then when you are done practicing, the melts will set and anyone hanging around can eat your work, or you can re-melt your chocolate and use it again.

Chocolate Swirls for decoration
Voilà!  You have sunflower cake pops!  If you have any questions feel free to contact me, and good luck.  These are eye catching, and people are going to love them!

Sunflower Candy Corn Cake Pops

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Oct. 2 – We have a contest winner! On our Facebook page, Laura Davis Walden guessed correctly with 139 pieces. Congrats Laura and thanks to everyone who participated!

——————–

It’s October 1, which means it’s the perfect time to hold a Halloween candy-counting contest. The intent is to get you ready for the real trick-or-treating and candy bartering on Oct. 31.

So, take a guess at how many Mini Reese’s Cups, Hershey’s Milk Chocolate Nuggets, M&M’s Peanut Butter pieces, and fun-sized Snickers are stuffed inside this 6-inch high x 8.5-inch diameter glass bowl. The first person to answer correctly wins a $25 Candy.com Gift Certificate. (One guess per person, please.) Winner will be announced tomorrow afternoon, Tues., Oct. 2.

Guess how many pieces of candy are in this bowl!

Good luck candy counting and enter your guess after this post or on Facebook or Twitter.

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24 Jul

The Gummy Bear Artist 0

Let's Limbo by Crummy Gummy
From a recent Twitter post, I became acquainted with Crummy Gummy, a street artist from Florida who specializes in photographing “life through a gummy bear’s eyes.”

His work causes laughter. I had to find out more.

As luck would have it, Crummy Gummy (the artist goes by that name) graciously agreed to an interview. His behind-the-scenes commentary is just as clever and funny as his artwork. Read on …

 

Candy.com:  How in the world did you start photographing gummy bears?

Crummy Gummy: I had a creative block a few years back and became frustrated with what I was producing, so one day I just forced myself to become creative. I told myself that I would visit a convenience store, find some random items, and try to create something artistic out of it. Gummy bears were one of those items, and I photographed them in four different scenarios that day. I posted them online and within a few days they got almost 1,000 likes. That was the start of all this madness. Good thing I didn’t buy a plunger that day.

 

Candy.com: What’s the hardest gummy bear color to photograph? I’m guessing it’s the clear pineapple.

Crummy Gummy: You would be right. The ‘features’ do not show up so well on camera so I try to avoid that one. Plus, the lack of color bores me. That doesn’t mean I won’t eat a couple, though.

 

Candy.com: What’s your main source of inspiration?

Crummy Gummy: I think, as an artist, you should be open to all sorts of things and situations for inspiration. My photographs are very much based off human interactions, such as drama and suspense, to name a few. However, humor is one of my biggest sources of inspiration. Who doesn’t love to laugh?

 

Candy.com: What’s been your most fun shoot to date?

Crummy Gummy: Well, they [gummy bears] can all be divas at times, but The Prankster Part 1 and 2 would be my favorite, mostly because of the story behind them. On Part 2, the idea was to have the gummy bear hold a lit matchstick about to set off an M-98 that another bear was resting on. I took this photograph at my parents house, and when I went to light the match I accidentally lit the M-98. In a panic, I tossed it away from me, and it flew right behind the sofa where my mom was taking a nap. Let’s just say I learned some new Spanish curse words and almost gave my mom a heart attack.

Crummy Gummy Firecracker

Candy.com: Do you think you’ll ever photograph any other types of candies?

Crummy Gummy: I have used peeps and jellybeans in some past photos, but you can expect some gummy worms appearing in some photos at my Candyality show in Chicago. (See show info below.)

 

Candy.com: Where can the average Joe see your work?

Crummy Gummy: You can visit my website at CrummyGummy.com, but to be up to date with anything I’m doing, check out my Facebook page. I am also on Instagram @CrummyGummy. I’m a bit of a social media nut.

 

Candy.com: Gotta ask … What’s your favorite gummy bear color and/or flavor?

Crummy Gummy: Hands down, the green ones. Green’s my favorite color, and they are sooooo yummy. They also seem to be the ones always getting hurt in my photographs. I guess they are like “The Middle Child” in a family to me.

Back Stabber Crummy Gummy Art


Crummy Gummy is coming to Chicago with a show titled, “Fashion Imposters.” The show is running from August 24 to September 6 at the Candyality candy shop, Water Tower
Place, 875 N. Michigan Ave.

The Meat Dress by Crummy GummyCrummy Gummy’s show hits during Chicago’s Magnificent Mile Fashion Festival, so expect new gummy bear photographs with a fashion/ celebrity twist.

The artist will be at his Fashion Imposters Candyality show on Sat., August 25 at 2 p.m. with free giveaways, signings, new artwork/prints for sale, and, of course, candy.

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in Candy, Gummy


Summer officially kicks off on June 20, and we’re ready to party … with candy (of course)! Fresh from the Sweets & Snacks EXPO in Chicago, our candy buyer, Rita Cummings, shares 4 hot candy trends with serious staying sticking power.


1. Colored Marshmallows


The classic white marshmallows we’ve always sandwiched between two graham crackers and a Hershey’s Bar, now come in a rainbow of colors.

Single-color marshmallows (a.k.a. pure fluff ) are ideal for candy buffets because they look beautiful in a glass apothecary jar and work well with other candies. They’re also fun to roast around a campfire. What 10-year-old (or 40-something) wouldn’t want a blue, pink, green, or yellow S’more?

Shake up things up s’more by swapping out the classic Hershey Bar with a Reese’s Peanut Butter Cup, Rolos, Cookies ‘n Cream Bar, or Ghirardelli Squares. Or make Rice Krispie Treats with pink marshmallows and sprinkle on hot pink and green M&M’s. It’s summer. Have fun. Go color crazy!


2. Unique Candy Toppings for Ice Cream


Sure, hot fudge sundaes will always be cool, but a DIY ice cream sundae bar with unique toppings like Mini Gummy Bears, Petite Pastel Nonpareils, Penguin Gummies,  Mini Sugared Cupcake Gummies, Single-Color Sixlets and Pearls  … that’s hot!


3. Cherry-Flavored Candy


If you’re a cherry lover, this could be your best summer ever. Candy & Snack TODAY magazine’s May/June 2012 story, Capitalizing on Cherry Candy, details continued consumer interest in cherry-flavored candy. In the story, Jelly Belly’s John Pola, vice president of specialty sales, sums it best, “People are attracted to red. It doesn’t matter what mix you have; the reds always go first, and in many instances that red is cherry.” Amen.


4. Still Sizzling: Salt Water Taffy

Salt Water TaffyBased on soaring Salt Water Taffy sales at Candy.com and its use in candy buffets, this is one candy category that’s going to have another great summer. And, it’s not just Vanilla, Chocolate, and Strawberry taffy getting all the attention. Exotic flavors like Huckleberry, Pomegranate, and Oranges & Creme are winning at checkout with event planners, brides, and traditional consumers planning warm-weather parties. Salt Water Taffy is one of those candies that transcends age, comes in a bazillion colors and flavors, holds up in warm weather, and isn’t expensive. For party planners, this is what dreams are made of.

p.s. - Today, May 23, is National Taffy Day! Let the chew fest begin …


 


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in Candy, Marshmallow, Taffy, Trade Shows, Trends

Have you ever known someone for a while, and later discovered one of their secret talents? Like, learning that a coworker sews amazing mens’ suits at night, or finding out that your retired neighbor happens to be a pool shark and travels to Vegas to compete. I love when this kind of stuff unfolds.

Last week at the Sweets & Snacks EXPO in Chicago, I came across a “Candy Never Goes Out of Style” exhibit. It was a display of couture dresses, jewelry, high-heeled pumps, and a Louis XVI chair all made out of candy wrappers and individual pieces of candy.

Exhibit A:


Turns out the dresses and accessories were created by Terese McDonald, owner of Candyality candy shops in Chicago, along with several of her staff members, siblings, and sister-in-law. The Louis XVI “sweet seat” was made by Beth Kimmerle, candy historian and author. Both Terese and Beth are friends of Candy.com, and neither came clean with their hidden talents until last week.

Terese says the “Skittles Riddles” dress (above) took her employee, Ashley Reinsmith, about 15 hours to make. (Skittles Riddles got lots of buzz at the Sweets & Snacks EXPO, winning the NCA’s Most Innovative New Product Award in the non-chocolate category.)

The matching Skittles Riddles high heels scream “Katy Perry!” …


Exhibit B:

According to Terese, the Jelly Belly Wedding Dress took the most amount of time to design and bring to life … about 50 hours. (That may have topped the time it took Sarah Burton of Alexander McQueen to create Kate Middleton’s wedding dress!) The bodice and boning accents were made with Vanilla Jelly Belly jelly beans.

Terese says two of her team members worked diligently on the Jelly Belly dress in the middle of her new Water Tower Chicago store location, while customers watched the progress.


Exhibit C:

The vibrant Wm. Wrigley Jr. 5 Gum Dress was made by Terese’s sister-in-law. Terese comes from a family of seven children and says all of her siblings and her sister-in-law have creative and artistic backgrounds. The talent pool runs deep! Terese says she and two of her sisters caught the fashion design bug two years ago when they collaborated on their first candy wrapper dress.

“We constantly study all of the current fashion trends and fashionable people, and make an inspiration board to get us going. Each dress is different as it expresses the vision of the artist,” says Terese.


Exhibit D:

Inspiration by J.Lo? This M&M’s Dress features a boho chic hat and rows and rows of wrappers cut like petals.


Exhibit E:


The summery tangerine dress made with Goetze’s Classic Vanilla Cow Tale wrappers took Terese and her crew about 36 hours to craft. The neckline features unwrapped Goetze’s Caramel Creams. (Yum!)

When asked about what happens with all the candy that gets unwrapped, Terese says, “Most companies donate the wrappers for our dresses, but from time to time, we do end up with vats of unwrapped candy. We recycle that candy because we do so many art projects in our stores. We don’t like to throw anything away.”


Exhibit F:

Beth Kimmerle’s antique Louis XVI chair was covered in retro candies like Tootsie Rolls, red licorice wheels, candy dots, Necco Wafers, and Pez. It was, by far, the sweetest seat in the house.

To learn more about the dresses and accessories that debuted on the Sweets & Snacks Expo runway, as well as Candyality’s upcoming candy fashion events, click here.

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Kristen Cumings, the artist behind some of the Jelly Belly Candy Company’s famous jelly bean art, knows her beans. In 2010, Kristen was commissioned by Jelly Belly to produce eight pieces of jelly bean art for a collection titled “Masterpieces of Jelly Belly Art.” This collection includes eight recreations of the world’s most most recognized works of  art, including Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa” and Vincent van Gogh’s “The Starry Night.” The Masterpieces collection is now on display through June at the Children’s Museum of the Upstate in Greenville, S.C.

 

My kids tell everybody that we meet that I’m a jelly bean artist. I’ve always been into art. My first jelly bean portrait was of Herman Rowland [chairman of the board, Jelly Belly]. It took me about three months to complete.

A typical commissioned piece for me is 4 feet wide by 5 feet tall and includes between 12,000 and 15,000 jelly beans. I now can finish a piece in about three weeks, which is roughly 100 hours.

I sort my beans by color in compartmentalized bead boxes. I’ve dropped one of those boxes on more than one occasion and have actually paid my kids to re-sort them for me.

For pieces that Jelly Belly commissions, the company orders a 10-pound box of each color. I use about 25 to 35 colors per piece, so we have a lot of leftovers in my house. My favorite Jelly Belly jelly bean color to work with is Island Punch. I dyed my hair the same color last year. My hair is now mostly red, but two parts are purple and pink striped. The purple stripes look like Island Punch. The pink stripes are more Strawberry Daiquiri.

I work in the evenings after my regular job. I am a special education classroom assistant and I do a lot of art with the kids. They love the jelly bean projects!

My favorite jelly bean portrait so far was the one I just finished. It’s of my son. My reference image was from when he was 7 years old.

Jelly Belly jelly bean art

Kristen Cumings' portrait of her son, Malcolm, at age 7.

I was bummed when Jelly Belly got rid of Peanut Butter and Caramel Apple jelly beans. They were my go-to colors for mid-range fleshtones. I hoarded them. To get that medium value now, I put two beans together—like Honey Bean and Chili Mango. For a shadow here and there, I’ll throw in a blue or a purple bean.

My favorite Jelly Bean flavor is Sour Cherry. I really like the sours.

One of my biggest challenges is knowing when to add in that odd color to make a piece really pop. I always try to match the tones of my reference images as much as possible, but sometimes the result can look too dull. That’s when I start taking out some beans and add in a bean color to make it livelier.

Jelly Belly jelly bean art

All colors pop in this recent jelly bean portrait by Kristen Cumings. The subject is her son's best friend, Bailey.

I just started a private commission for Lola Salazar who is the owner of Lola’s Sugar Rush. It’s a cute image of her for her candy shop.  I’m really excited about it! My commissioned pieces run about $3,500 to $5,000, depending on the size of the canvas.

My best friend’s son was upset that I didn’t include Harry Potter’s lightening scar in the portrait that I created. The reference image I was given to use from Warner Bros. didn’t include it. On the under-painting that I did, though, the scar is there. You just can’t see it because the beans cover it up.

Jelly Belly jelly bean art


Photo credits: Samuel Levi Jones (top photo), Kristen Cumings (jelly bean artwork photos)

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in Bulk, Candy, Jelly Beans, Jelly Belly Candy Company, News

We received quite a few responses to last Friday’s contest question: “What Short-and-Sweet Phrase Would You Put on a Valentine Candy Heart?”

After careful review, a Top 25 list has emerged.

Post your favorite on our Facebook Page. The phrase with the most thumbs up wins the $25 Candy.com gift certificate.

SM:)LE
WUV
I LIKE U
LUV U BOO
1 IN A MILL
LQQN 4 LUV
S’UP
MWUAH!
4 EVER URS
HAPPY 2 ❤ U
UR MY FAV
❤ U 4EVR
SWEET CHEEKS
PUCKER UP
HI CUPCAKE
LUVM (love you very much)
LYL (love you lots)
LOL (lots of love)
ME + U = LOVE
SMOOCHES ❤
FB ME
TAG ME
PIN ME
YES, PLEASE
JUST SAYIN’

Polls close tomorrow night at 11:59 p.m. est. The winner will be posted on Wed. morning. Thanks all for participating!

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in Contests, Valentine's Day

Two sisters set their sights on opening a candy store. Ten months later, they were up and running strong in Glen Allen, Va.

Sarah Solomon tells the story of how she went from high-tech sales to stay-at-home mom to launching a contemporary candy store with her older sister, Chrissy.

Candy.com: So, you opened Sweet Spot in Glen Allen, Va., with your sister in November 2010 after a successful career in software. What ultimately made you jump from software sales to Candy Land?

Sarah: Before my career in software, I had worked in retail for a few small locally owned businesses.  It was during that time that I developed the dream of owning my own business. I left my career in software sales 4 ½ years ago to stay home with my son. While home with my growing family, my sister and I would talk more and more about starting a business together. I just wasn’t sure exactly what it would be. It was my sister, Chrissy that always had Candy Land on the brain. It has always been her vision to create a modern version of an old-fashioned candy store.   The more we talked about it, the more I wanted this place to exist. With her creative vision and my experience in retail and sales, I felt confident that we could open a successful business together.

Candy.com: How long did it take you and your sister to get your candy shop up and running after you both made the decision to go for it?

Sarah: We’ve been talking about this for as long as I can remember, but we decided to go for it in January 2010 and we opened our doors November 20, 2010. We signed our lease in August 2010, so most things happened between August and November. It was a crazy few months!

Candy.com: Your store definitely has a modern vibe, yet is stocked with nostalgic and hard-to-find candies. How did your contemporary design esthetic come to life?

Sarah: Since our store concept encourages guests to come in and hang out while they enjoy their sweets, it was important to us that the store be bright and fun. We both love design and knew from the beginning that we wanted to hire a firm to help us.  The best decision we made throughout the whole start-up process was to hire the local design firm, Visible Proof.  They helped with so much more than the design of the store. Our graphic designer, Ansel Olson created our amazing graphics, which are carried through the store on our bags, boxes, gift packaging, T-shirts, and even chocolates! They helped us create an identity and brand.

Visible Proof has received multiple awards this year for their work on Sweet Spot from the graphics to the overall store design. We couldn’t be happier how the store turned out.

Candy.com: When we talked at the 2011 Sweets & Snacks EXPO, you mentioned how you really work hard to find unique candies for your shop. Any new product(s) from the expo that made you weak in the knees?

Sarah: Leaf Brand’s Farts Candy. I’m still not sold on the name but I’m sold on the candy! They were delicious and I wanted more. We tried them out on our candy testers and they all agreed that they are going to give Nerds a run for their money. Now we just need to get them in the store.

Candy.com: Your upcoming “Candy Lego Building Contest” with candy Legos and Marshmallow Fluff sounds like a dream come true for Lego lovers. How do you come up with all of your clever in-store events?

Sarah: We always knew that we were building Sweet Spot to be more than just a retail candy store.  It was built to create memories and experiences for people.  We wanted to create a place where we wanted to take our own kids and the events are an important part of that.  As for the ideas, I wish I could take credit but it is all Chrissy. She is our real life Willy Wonka. If only I had a dollar for every time I heard her say, “Wouldn’t it be fun if….”

On National Gumdrop Day, I had to talk her out of trying to get permission to drop gumdrops off the balcony several floors above our store so kids could catch them in buckets on the sidewalk below.

Candy.com:  Since your grand opening, is there anything that’s really surprised you and your sister about the business?

Sarah: I’m surprised by how many people (other than Chrissy and me) are emotionally connected to the nostalgic memories that candy and sweets can trigger. It is so fun to watch someone get excited about finding a candy or soda they haven’t seen since they were a kid. It is amazing how something so small can bring back a flood of childhood memories and make you feel so warm inside. We love that we can share that with people. Just the other day, someone came in and asked if we had Bonkers. I hadn’t thought about that candy in years and it brought back a flood of memories of my childhood. They should bring those back!

Candy.com: Any plans for opening additional outposts?

Sarah: We would definitely like to expand and have been researching additional locations in Virginia.

For more information, visit:

ShopSweetSpot.com
Facebook/Sweet-Spot-Candy

Twitter/SweetSpotCandy

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in Business, Candy